How’s the quality of life in Taiwan?

Question by Joker: How’s the quality of life in Taiwan?
Hey guys, I’m Filipino and I was born and raised in the USA. I’ve lived in the Philippines for a couple of years and I don’t really like it because it’s such a poor country. Ever since then, I’ve read NUMEROUS books on economic development. I’ve read books on how Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, etc developed advance economies.

Well, I’m fascinated with Taiwan because I believe its a model the Philippines can follow. According to the CIA Factbook, only 0.95% of the population live below the poverty line. That’s astounding if you ask me. whereas in the Philippines, 40% of the population live below the poverty line (and its clearly visible when you’re there)

So, I’d like to know, how’s your quality of life? Well, to add more details to it, what kind of housing do the majority of the people live in? How’s the quality of it? Is it clean? If you’re from Taiwan, do you live in an apartment? Do you like your apartment?

I know it’s kind of weird but I like looking at pictures of Taipei, Kaohsiung, Tainan, etc. I think those cities look beautiful. Some may laugh and completely disagree but I love urban jungles.

anyways, yep, that’s my question. Thanks guys

Best answer:

Answer by Kaia
In the past 50 years, Taiwan has experienced tremendous economic development. The per capita income increased from about US0 in 1949 to today’s US,200. Citizens here have enjoyed an affluence unprecedented in Chinese history. However, the garbage problem and air and water pollution have become so serious that in 1995 the German magazine Der Spiegel referred to Taiwan as a Schweinestall (“pigsty”). Taiwan’s quality of life in the past decades seems to lag far behind its economic development, and is by no means a miracle. But how is quality to be measured?

Since Taiwan’s first economic plan was carried out in the 1950s, the economy has been gradually transformed from one based on agriculture to one based on technology and manufacturing. By 1987, the ROC’s foreign exchange reserves had exceeded US billion. The gross national product (GNP) reached US4.8 billion in 1997 (See Table II), and was ranked eighteenth in the world. Taiwan’s rapid economic development has brought its society a higher standards of living.

“From indicators like less expenditure on food, shorter working time, and longer life expectancy and more education, one can clearly see Taiwan’s advances,” says Professor Chai Sunglin, founder of the Consumers’ Foundation, a private organization for the protection of consumers’ rights.

“As I know, many people in some underdeveloped nations spend almost 100 percent of their money on food—And they’re still starving. Forty or 50 years ago Taiwan’s people also spent about 75 percent of their money on food, with most of the rest going to pay medical bills. Nowadays, Taiwan’s people spend less than 30 percent on food. This means people here have more to spend on entertainment and cultural activities.”

Life expectancy, according to Chai, is also an important factor to consider when evaluating the improvement of living standards in Taiwan. “Life expectancy in some countries is shorter because of malnutrition and lack of medical facilities, as well as widespread contagious disease. People in Taiwan now enjoy a longer life expectancy than before—It’s increased from about 58 years in 1952 to about 74 today. This indicates that public health in Taiwan is making progress,” says Chai. (See Table III)

“On the average, Taiwan’s people spent three years in school in 1949, and 60 percent of the population was illiterate. Now, the average length of education is 15 years,” says Chai, adding that the literacy rate is over 94 percent. He remembers that when he graduated from elementary school in the mid-1940s, only a half dozen of his classmates (including himself) were able to continue into junior high school. “Now, if people want to study, they have many opportunities to satisfy their wish,” says Chai.

Chai also mentions that the amount of time people spend working is much less in Taiwan than it was. “Before, most people in Taiwan worked all day, every day. If we calculate by the number of hours in a year, people nowadays spend an average of about 25 percent of their time working, and have much more time for recreation.”

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Do you think there is a lack of historical education relating to Taiwan?

Question by chububobcat????: Do you think there is a lack of historical education relating to Taiwan?
With so many people posting ridiculous half truths and flat out lies regarding Taiwan and its connections with the PRC government or lack there of. Do you feel there is a serious lack of information in History books around the world relating to Taiwan and its history?

Not just current history that deals with the rouge PRC government and the Nationalist ROC governments (And I said rouge because the CCP staged a coupe under the guise of a revolution to take control of China), but also with the histories of the Aboriginals that lived on the island for a couple thousand years, the histories of the people who lived under the Japanese colonial occupation, the history of the people who immigrated to Taiwan from China during the Koxinga rule and subsequent annexation by the Qing after defeating Koxinga, and the histories of Dutch period of occupation.

I know that in the Anping district of Tainan there is a museum that talks about some of the history of the Dutch and in the Chibi fort has histories of Koxinga, but over all I think there is a complete lack of information regarding Taiwan’s history. There is also a couple wiki pages relating to the history of Taiwan/Formosa, but this information isn’t taught in schools. Which allows for people to be completely taken in by any and all half truths, full lies, and propaganda that surrounds Taiwan.

Am I the only one that thinks this or do others think there should be more education related towards Taiwan?

Best answer:

Answer by We never left!
There is a lack of information. I totally agree that there should be more (accurate) information available in regards to the history of Taiwan!

Maybe, by providing such information on a widespread basis, a greater number of persons in the world would better understand the Taiwanese, their multicultural background and centuries-long struggle for peaceful coexistence with others. The road to recognition and higher status requires the respect of others, and respect requires the dissemination of information. The current lack of valid information creates a void into which all sorts of false claims are shouted out and then mistakenly believed by others.

Like a rose trying to grow in a desert, if nobody pays attention to its struggle and chooses to water the flower, it will surely die. And, that is a real tragedy… for a rose in a desert is truly a beautiful and magical thing to behold, providing an inspiration to weary travelers.

Hmm.. Proud American supporter of the People’s Republic of China must have a whole lot of Wal-Mart stock. Is he still getting rich off of poisoning children?

What do you think? Answer below!

Help with Taiwan Itinerary?

Question by Kelsey: Help with Taiwan Itinerary?
I will arrive in Taiwan Feb 12 and I will be there til the 21st night. My flight arrives in Taipei and I will be leaving from there as well. My trip isn’t long, but I’d like to head south. What places should I definitely go to and what places are a waste of time? I don’t want to see only city.

Feb 13: I was planning on going from Taipei to Taichung, wander around there and stay at the Fuh Chun Hotel. What should I see around here?

From there I was planning on going South to Chiayi. Can anyone suggest cheap hotels there? I heard the scenery is supposed to be nice, and the hot springs.

Maybe Tainan for a night?

Then I wanted to head to Kaohsiung and stay around there til I have to go back to Taipei and catch my flight.

Feb 21: Taipei

Basically along that route, what places would you recommend to visit in the time I have? I’d love to do hiking and see places other than cities, even though that is all i have marked down. Alishan sounds nice, but it seems not practical for the time I have.

Also, if I reversed it and went straight to Kaohsiung, would it be better to make my way up from there to Taipei?

Any help would be appreciated.

Best answer:

Answer by Zima31
Just to let you know they have convenient high speed rail system to get around Taiwan.

I had less than a week and I traveled from Taipei all the way to Kending. So I’ll tell you what I saw

Taipei: You should definitely go to 101. The National Palace Museum is really nice too, but it’ll take awhile to go through all the exhibits. Although you can just choose which one you are interested in. The other main things to see in the city are the CKS Memorial and the SunYatsen Memorial.

Taichung: Sun Moon Lake. There are buses that take you there, but I think it takes 1-2 hours. I just shared a taxi for half the time because we didn’t have much time. There’s a gorgeous lake and its really nice if its not raining. There are buses that drive around the lake, but my friends and I decided to just walk. There is a peacock garden and a large temple. There is also an aboriginal village if you’d like to buy any souvenirs.

Alishan- Ok so we didn’t realize that our hotel was actually on the mountain. But if you do stay at a hotel in Alishan. You have to wake up at 3AM to take a train to the top of the mountain to see the sun rise around 5-6. Then later on you can visit Alishan park. You said you wanted to go hiking. This is a good place. You walk around the park and they have a few points laid out for visitors to see. It’s a nice walk even in the rain. And it only takes a few hours. We then took the Alishan train back into the city. So I don’t think it’ll take too much time.

I don’t know much about any other cities sorry. Hope this helps.

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Are Glowing trees to replace street lamps ? Is it wise to monkey around within the order of nature?

Question by Bilbo Baggins: Are Glowing trees to replace street lamps ? Is it wise to monkey around within the order of nature?
Pretty cool……but is it really wise?

The golden glow of street lights could soon be replaced by the green fluorescence of tree leaves. Scientists from the Academia Sinica and the National Cheng Kung University in Taipei and Tainan have implanted glowing, sea urchin shaped gold nanoparticles, known as bio light emitting diodes, or bio LEDs, inside the leaves of a plant.

The new nanoparticles could replace the electricity powered street light with biologically powered light that removes CO2 from the atmosphere 24 hours a days.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40355608/ns/technology_and_science-future_of_energy/
??
Aquarium plants invade water ways of the world?

Caulerpa taxifolia has already reshaped the Mediterranean Sea, mainly because no one listened to the one man who recognized the threat back in 1989. It all began off the coast of Monaco.
GEORG POHNERT: The amount of toxin in the Mediterranean species is really surprisingly high for me as a chemist. It’s a very powerful and very special defense mechanism. That might be why Caulerpa spreads in the Mediterranean very effectively.

Pohnert discovered that although the toxin was not lethal to humans or animals, it made Caulerpa almost totally inedible. And if nothing would eat it, there was nothing to stop its advance. If it took over, the Mediterranean’s animal life would be forced to flee or starve to death.
??

Best answer:

Answer by Jimmy Tumbrello
“Hell yes it is!” Luke 5:12

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why is my chinese tutor acting so weird?

Question by pooptastic: why is my chinese tutor acting so weird?
So I am learning mandarin and I ended up getting a chinese speaking partner whose from tainan and she was really nice and would call me everyday and help me whenever I wanted and was super nice to me.

But then about 2 weeks ago I introduced her to my girlfriend and since then she doesn’t call me and all a sudden is always busy, it is a real strange and drastic change in attitude and she has not been able to meet for 2 weeks when she used to be available every day?

Why is she acting like this, I almost feel like it has to do with my girlfriend

Best answer:

Answer by ramses
that’s immature!

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Can I live in Taiwan, and go to an Online School in USA?

Question by wojiao_chicago: Can I live in Taiwan, and go to an Online School in USA?
For example:

Let’s say I live in Tainan City, Taiwan. And, I want to work full-time. But, I don’t want to go to school there, but I still want to get a degree in business. SO! If i go to an online college (like, University of Phoenix) can i live in Taiwan while attending it. And if so, what visa do i get, and if not, what can i do?

Best answer:

Answer by dadof7n2001
You can attend an online school from anywhere in the world and you don’t need a visa to do it.

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Q&A: How much digression to you like in a ‘train of thought’ type book?

Question by Asmodeous: How much digression to you like in a ‘train of thought’ type book?
I thought Catcher in the Rye was perfect with its amount of Digression, but maybe that’s just me.

When a book is in First Person how much inner thought and rambling do you like in its descriptions? I’m writing right now just for practice. Here’s an example of a passage, talking mostly about rain but I feel it digresses way too much: :::::

—————————————————

I was walking to school for my third or fourth day. I just kept thinking about how Beautiful Taiwan looks in the rain. It really does look perfect, to me anyway. Back in the United States it’s different. Things there look as if they’re supposed to be in the sun. The glowing green grass, freshly lacquered wood fences, mothers with their strollers. Always mothers with their strollers; and those neon yellow, plastic signs in the shape of a man that say “Slow: Kids at Play”. The signs were always jutting out halfway into the road, too, so cars pretty much had to slow down to avoid crashing into the things. I liked seeing those in the rain, at least. In Taiwan, though, everything was already dirty. Rusted grating on the windows, broken bicycles leaning against metal garage doors. Houses stacked upon houses. Shopping for clothing while kids watched TV and ate their lunch’s right in the same room. A chaos I could never create, so disorganized but so perfect. It all reminded me of my school desk back in fourth grade, how everything was all out of place but I still knew where it all was.
Taiwan was meant to be in the rain, that’s all I was thinking. It calmed me down.
“You like it? Because it’s like ‘end of the world’?” My first host mother said to me that morning as I was talking about it.
Moreover, though, it helped me feel better since I was so new to the country. I was only sixteen years old at the time, and never had been in a situation like the one I was in. Moving to a foreign country is strange, all by your-self too. I wasn’t in some pansy country like Germany, either, where everyone is white. I think, honest to god, I was probably one of the only white kids in the city. I mean, unless the rest of them just stayed inside. I lived in Tainan, Taiwan which is way south of the Capital, Taipei. Taipei is where they send all (most) of the exchange students. I was a special case, though, since I was last minute. They set me up with the family of a girl that was in my town back in New York, but she studied so much I never saw her. I heard her coughing a few times, maybe. She didn’t even come down for dinner; her brother brought it up to her.

Best answer:

Answer by Purple Orchid
Digression or not I didn’t find it to be all that interesting… Rambling and such should be avoided unless you are a master writer really.

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Where can I find Architectural plans for Taiwanese houses?

Question by Shirou X: Where can I find Architectural plans for Taiwanese houses?
I recently started going back to school part time, trying to finish my architecture degree, and when my professor found out that I lived in Taiwan he gave me an assignment to design a full set of design plans and 3D renderings for various angles of the buildings interior and exterior. Even though I live in Taiwan I never actually paid much attention to the design of the buildings around me. So I am hoping some one can tell me where I can find blue prints, models, floor plans, anything like this that would help me to complete my assignment.

I am not looking for anything fancy like Taipei 101 or the gigantic fancy houses suburbs of Taipei (mostly because they are too complex), rather I am looking for something like the normal 3-5 story houses, or even the traditional Chinese or Fukien style country homes.
Anything that represents the houses that you see in Taiwan.

Here are a few examples of the types of buildings that I am talking about.
These are houses in Tainan in the An’Ping ~ (http://community.webshots.com/photo/full…
This is a blinding of traditional and modern Taiwanese housing in Tainan County
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2165/2197…
This a traditional style Taiwanese house I don’t think that it is a Fujian style but still in the ball park~ (http://community.webshots.com/photo/full…
This a modern style house in Taipei ~ (http://www.culture.gov.tw/d_upload_tca_p…
This is a typical house in Taichung
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3458/3870…

If anyone has any sort of useful information about this your help will be very appreciated.

Best answer:

Answer by TaiwanTeacher
Have you tried contacting TRCI?
http://www.tcri.org.tw/English/

You might also try contacting NTUST – Dept. of Architecture
http://www.ad-e.ntust.edu.tw/front/bin/home.phtml

What do you think? Answer below!

Where can I find Architectural design plans for Taiwanese houses?

Question by Shirou X: Where can I find Architectural design plans for Taiwanese houses?
I recently started going back to school part time, trying to finish my architecture degree, and when my professor found out that I lived in Taiwan he gave me an assignment to design a full set of design plans and 3D renderings for various angles of the buildings interior and exterior. Even though I live in Taiwan I never actually paid much attention to the design of the buildings around me. So I am hoping some one can tell me where I can find blue prints, models, floor plans, anything like this that would help me to complete my assignment.

I am not looking for anything fancy like Taipei 101 or the gigantic fancy houses suburbs of Taipei (mostly because they are too complex), rather I am looking for something like the normal 3-5 story houses, or even the traditional Chinese or Fukien style country homes.
Anything that represents the houses that you see in Taiwan.

Here are a few examples of the types of buildings that I am talking about.
These are houses in Tainan in the An’Ping ~ (http://community.webshots.com/photo/fullsize/2145677290078206077oNRbQB)
This is a blinding of traditional and modern Taiwanese housing in Tainan County
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2165/2197244026_4a8be8a419.jpg)
This a traditional style Taiwanese house I don’t think that it is a Fujian style but still in the ball park~ (http://community.webshots.com/photo/fullsize/1220262605049765968GposVB)
This a modern style house in Taipei ~ (http://www.culture.gov.tw/d_upload_tca_pro/cms/image/A0/B0/C0/D0/E0/F997/283d1bc3-0bd8-4507-b4cd-c056b596e5ef.jpg)
This is a typical house in Taichung
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3458/3870620876_909f00ffd6_o.jpg)

If anyone has any sort of useful information about this your help will be very appreciated.
Thank you

Best answer:

Answer by TaiwanTeacher
Hmmm… not a lot of help for you here, I guess.

Hope you have good luck in finding your plans.

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what’s a better plan for my trip in taiwan?

Question by akane827: what’s a better plan for my trip in taiwan?
my sister and i are going to taiwan for a week. i will already be in taiwan, mostly in tainan for community service and stuff, and can travel back with the people i was with to the tpe airport. my sister plans to fly in and meet me up for the extra week i plan to stay in taiwan. we plan to just mostly explore taipei and tainan only. my question is how we should schedule our week in taiwan. i was thinking that from the airport, we would get a hotel in taipei and explore there for maybe 4 days, then take the high speed rail to tainan and get a hotel and explore there for a couple days, then the day we leave, take the high speed rail to the airport? or should we go to tainan first and then taipei or spend more time than i planned, etc. will it be annoying to carry our bags around? just would like to hear some suggestions. 🙂 thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by Red_devils
Just a warning, once you get to Taipei, you willn’t want to leave Taipei. There isn’t much in Tainan, unless you are an old school person. Rather spend most of your time in Taipei. Your choice, hope this helps.

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