If Taiwan has “always been a part of China”, then when did China begin to exist, AD230, the 1700s, 1949, or…?

Question by We Never Left!!: If Taiwan has “always been a part of China”, then when did China begin to exist, AD230, the 1700s, 1949, or…?
Was it around A.D. 230 that China came to exist because it discovered an island offshore?

“Records from ancient China indicate that the Han Chinese might have known of the existence of the main island of Taiwan since the Three Kingdoms period (third century, A.D. 230), having assigned offshore islands in the vicinity names like Greater Liuqiu and Lesser Liuqiu (etymologically, but perhaps not semantically, identical to Ry?ky? in Japanese), though none of these names has been definitively matched to the main island of Taiwan. Han Chinese began settling in the Penghu islands in the 1200s, but Taiwan’s hostile tribes and its lack of the trade resources valued in that era rendered it unattractive to all but “occasional adventurers or fishermen engaging in barter” until the 16th century.”

Was China founded in the 1600s instead?
However…
“Despite Taiwan being rumored as the fabled “Island of Dogs,” “Island of Women,” or any of the other fabled island thought, by Han literati, to lie beyond the seas, Taiwan was officially regarded by Qing Emperor Kangxi as “a ball of mud beyond the pale of civilization” and did not appear on any map of the imperial domain until 1683.[13] The act of presenting a map to the emperor was equal to presenting the lands of the empire. It took several more years before the Qing court would recognize Taiwan as part of the Qing realm. Prior to the Qing Dynasty, China was conceived as a land bound by mountains, rivers and seas. The idea of an island as a part of China was unfathomable to the Han prior to the Qing frontier expansion effort of the 17th Century.”

Or, was it in the 1700s?

“According to the accounts by Huang Shujing, a Qing official dispatched to Taiwan in the early 18th century, a supra-tribal leadership remained in existence in the Dadu area at that time. However, during the reign of Yongzheng Emperor of Qing later in that century, the population in the traditional Middag territories rose to oppose heavy labor imposed by the Qing authorities, and was brutally quelled by Qing troops and collaborative tribes in 1732, a year after the initial uprising.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Middag

So, was it in 1949, when the PRC was founded?

Was it in 1980, when the PRC revised its consitution to lay claim to Taiwan?

I don’t get it… Please explain how the term “ALWAYS” is applied in the case of Taiwan being a part of China, since it certainly doesn’t appear to have any basis in truth.
I guess the logic here escapes people. What I am asking is “Where is the ‘China’ that Taiwan has ALWAYS been a part of?” Since, it was not a part of Ming Dynasty China, was only partially a part of Qing Dynasty China, was not a part of China at all from 1895-1945 (perhaps 1951), and wasn’t claimed by the PRC until 1980… WHERE is this “China” that Taiwan has ALWAYS been a part of? Is this concept of an Imperial China that has always owned whatever it NOW claims to own just some hallucination in the minds of the Chinese people with no basis in reality?

Best answer:

Answer by ?
I have a friend in tucson az that konw’s thing of china. ded you no japanese in a way are from china.

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Is UN Resolution 2758 in violation of the United Nation’s Charter?

Question by We Never Left!!: Is UN Resolution 2758 in violation of the United Nation’s Charter?
A widely accepted online statement:
“Some viewpoints assert that Resolution 2758 has solved the issue of “China’s representation” in the United Nations, but left the issue of Taiwan’s representation unresolved in a practical sense. The ROC government continues to hold control over Taiwan and other islands. While the PRC claims sovereignty over all of China and claims that Taiwan is part of China, it does not exercise sovereignty over Taiwan, and has never done so. The ROC government claimed sovereignty over the Chinese Mainland until recently but its present policy seeks to represent the area it controls in diplomatic matters. The ROC’s legal status in contemporary times somewhat mirrors that of the PRC pre-1971.

The Resolution has been criticized as illegal by the Republic of China government, since expulsion of a member requires the recommendation of the Security Council and can only occur if a nation “has persistently violated the Principles contained in the present Charter,” according Article 6.

The Government Information Office of the Republic of China asserts:

So flawed is this Resolution that only its effective repeal by the General Assembly can provide any hope of expunging the stain on the U.N.’s escutcheon in the international system. Taiwan partially adopted this strategy, and attempted to begin a debate on the repeal of Resolution 2758 during the Fifty-Second General Assembly. Although turned aside in 1997 by the P.R.C.’s energetic diplomatic lobbying, the issue of the R.O.C.’s status at the U.N. will not disappear.
Attempts have been made to get a review of Resolution 2758 onto the agenda with a proposal noting that “as to its return to the United Nations, the Government has made it clear that it no longer claims to represent all of China, but that it seeks representation only for its 21.8 million people”.

Recent actions by the Taiwanese government to apply for membership under the name “Taiwan” highlight this intention.

According to the UN website, no member state has ever been expelled from UN since its inception. From the viewpoint of the UN, the change of the representation of China in the UN only reflected the de facto government change after the Chinese civil war. The representative right of China as a member state has never been expelled out of the UN, and what was expelled were only the unqualified representatives of China, at the same time the UN accepted the qualified ones from the government PRC as the legal representative of China.

Supporters of ROC admission to the UN argue that the resolution only asserts that the PRC is the legitimate government of China, but makes no mention of the ROC being an illegitimate government, nor of which (if either) is the legitimate ruler of Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores. Opponents of ROC admission follow the viewpoint of the PRC, which sees itself as the legitimate ruler of China and which considers that Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and Penghu are part of China.”

Has the UN lost its legitimacy by continuing to support a nation (the PRC) whose government has NEVER agreed to the terms of the UN Charter and, in its post-admission era, revised its own constitution to be in direct conflict with the UN Charter?

Is there any validity to these chants by the 23 million Taiwanese who remain unrepresented in the UN due to false claims enforced by the PRC?
“Taiwan for the Taiwanese!” “Eject the PRC from the UN!’

Best answer:

Answer by Charlie Sheen
That’s not a question, it’s long-winded pseudo-intellectual flatulence.

The people of Taiwan are represented in the United Nations by the People’s Republic of China. Taiwan is a province within the People’s Republic of China. The United Nations acknowledges the One China Policy.

Taiwan is part of China and always has been. Deal with it, then move on with your life.

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What is your favorite place in Taiwan?

Question by chububobcat????: What is your favorite place in Taiwan?
I am curious what are other people’s favorite place(s) in Taiwan is/are?

Personally my favorite place is Taichung, its where I live and its probably the only place that I can drive aimlessly with out getting lost in a few minutes. Besides Taichung, I love Tainan because of its history and culture, and the lay back attitude of the residence. I am also particularly fond of Penghu Island mostly for the wonderful beaches and the unique architecture and culture.

Whats your favorite place(s)?
Oh yes, Riyue Lake at Taichung park is one of my favorite places to visit^^ I often go there to walk around for exercise.
@??
Yes the China has a lot of things to see but compare the size of China to Taiwan and you can see why. But Taiwan still has a lot of great things.
Interesting how everyone seems to like Taipei. Haha where’s the love for Taichung.

?? After re-reading your answer and doing some Googleling I realized that you are 80% likely not referring to the ??? aka Riyue your referring to some lake in Mainland china.

Best answer:

Answer by lildude211us
I actually have a lot of favorite places, but most notably Taipei for its good public transportation and i can get around the city without having to drive. Lots of good food there, things to do etc..

I do want to go spend some time in Southern Taiwan, like Tainan, Kenting, Kaohsiung and those areas that i have never been too (like Penghu Island) I’ve seen those outdoor shows that go to these different places and it just looks so cool.

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I have to write a report on the First and Second Sino-Japanese war…?

penghu
by Wm Jas

Question by ?????: I have to write a report on the First and Second Sino-Japanese war…?
This is all the information I already have:

First-
Date1 August 1894 – 17 April 1895
LocationKorea, Manchuria, Taiwan, Yellow Sea
ResultJapanese victory and a significant loss of prestige for the Qing. Korea becomes independent from Qing China.
Territorial
changesQing China loses the influence of the Korean peninsula to the Empire of Japan.
Qing Dynasty China cedes Taiwan, Penghu, and Liaodong Peninsula to the Empire of Japan

Second:
Date7 July 1937 – 9 September 1945 (minor fighting since 1931)
LocationChina
ResultUnconditional surrender of all Japanese forces in China with Allied victory in World War II.
Territorial
changesRetrocession to China of Manchuria, and renunciation of sovereignty rights for Taiwan and Penghu according to the San Francisco Peace Treaty

Do you have any additional information? Thanks.
1.) I do not know why this was put into language.
2.) This is for a lecture I am doing, I am 75 years old, I am not a kid…I can not find any infomation on the Sino-Japanese wars,

Best answer:

Answer by Erik Van Thienen
Have a look at Wikipedia :

“First Sino-Japanese War” : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Sino-Japanese_War

“Second Sino-Japanese War” : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Japanese_war

From the Encyclopædia Britannica CD :

“Sino-Japanese War (1894-95)”

“conflict between Japan and China that marked the emergence of Japan as a major world power and demonstrated the weakness of the Chinese Empire. The war grew out of conflict between the two countries for supremacy in Korea. Korea had long been China’s most important client state, but its strategic location opposite the Japanese islands and its natural resources of coal and iron attracted Japan’s interest. In 1875 Japan, which had begun to adopt Western technology, forced Korea to open itself to foreign, especially Japanese, trade and to declare itself independent from China in its foreign relations.

Japan soon became identified with the more radical modernizing forces within the Korean government, while China continued to sponsor the conservative officials gathered around the royal family. In 1884 a group of pro-Japanese reformers attempted to overthrow the Korean government, but Chinese troops under Gen. Yüan Shih-k’ai rescued the King, killing several Japanese legation guards in the process. War was avoided between Japan and China by the signing of the Li-Ito Convention, in which both nations agreed to withdraw troops from Korea.

In 1894, however, Japan, flushed with national pride in the wake of its successful modernization program and its growing influence upon young Koreans, was not so ready to compromise. In that year, Kim Ok-kyun, the pro-Japanese Korean leader of the 1884 coup, was lured to Shanghai and assassinated, probably by agents of Yüan Shih-k’ai. His body was then put aboard a Chinese warship and sent back to Korea, where it was quartered and displayed as a warning to other rebels. The Japanese government took this as a direct affront, and the Japanese public was outraged. The situation was made more tense later in the year when the Tonghak rebellion broke out in Korea, and the Chinese government, at the request of the Korean king, sent troops to aid in dispersing the rebels. The Japanese considered this a violation of the Li-Ito Convention, and they sent 8,000 troops to Korea. When the Chinese tried to reinforce their own forces, the Japanese sank the British steamer “Kowshing,” which was carrying the reinforcements, further inflaming the situation.

War was finally declared on Aug. 1, 1894. Although foreign observers had predicted an easy victory for the more massive Chinese forces, the Japanese had done a more successful job of modernizing, and they were better equipped and prepared. Japanese troops scored quick and overwhelming victories on both land and sea. By March 1895 the Japanese had successfully invaded Shantung and Manchuria and had fortified posts that commanded the sea approaches to Peking. The Chinese sued for peace.

In the Treaty of Shimonoseki, which ended the conflict, China recognized the independence of Korea and ceded Taiwan, the adjoining Pescadores, and the Liaotung Peninsula in Manchuria.

China also agreed to pay a large indemnity and to give Japan trading privileges on Chinese territory. This treaty was later somewhat modified by Russian fears of Japanese expansion, and the combined intercession of Russia, France, and Germany forced Japan to return the Liaotung Peninsula to China.

China’s defeat encouraged the Western powers to make further demands of the Chinese government. In China itself, the war triggered a reform movement that attempted to renovate the government; it also resulted in the beginnings of revolutionary activity against the Manchu rulers of China.”

“Sino-Japanese War (1937-45)”

“conflict that broke out when China began full-scale resistance to the expansion of Japanese influence in its territory (begun in 1931). In an effort to unseat the Nationalist government of Chiang Kai-shek, the Japanese occupied large areas of eastern China in 1937-38. A stalemate then ensued, and Japanese forces were diverted to Southeast Asia and to the Pacific War against the Western Powers and their allies beginning in 1941. Japan’s World War II defeat by the Allies ended its occupation of China (1945).”

“The Sino-Japanese War
On July 7, 1937, a minor clash between Japanese and Chinese troops near Pei-p’ing (Peking’s name under the National Government) finally led the two nations into war. The Japanese government tried for several weeks to settle the incident locally, but China’s mood was highly nationalistic and public opinion clamoured for resistance to further aggression. In late July, new fighting broke out. The Japanese quickly took Pei-p’ing and captured Tientsin. On August 13 savage fighting broke out in Shanghai. By now the prestige of both nations was committed, and they were locked in a war.

Phase one
As never before in modern times, the Chinese united themselves against a foreign enemy. China’s standing armies in 1937 numbered some 1,700,000 men, with 500,000 in reserve. Japan’s naval and air superiority were unquestioned. But Japan could not commit its full strength to campaigns in China; the main concern of the Japanese Army was the Soviet Union, while for the Japanese Navy it was the United States.

During the first year of the undeclared war, Japan won victory after victory against sometimes stubborn Chinese resistance. By late December, Shanghai and Nanking had fallen. But China had demonstrated to the world its determination to resist the invader; this gave the government time to search for foreign support. China found its major initial help from the Soviet Union. On Aug. 21, 1937, the Soviet Union and China signed a nonaggression pact, and the former quickly began sending munitions, military advisers, and hundreds of aircraft with Soviet pilots. Japanese forces continued to win important victories. By mid-1938 Japanese armies controlled the railway lines and major cities of northern China. They took Canton on October 12, stopping the railway supply line to Wu-han, the temporary Chinese capital, and captured Han-k’ou, Han-yang, and Wu-ch’ang on October 25-26. The Chinese government and military command moved to Chungking in Szechwan, farther up the Yangtze and behind a protective mountain screen.

At the end of this first phase of the war, the National Government had lost the best of its modern armies, its air force and arsenals, most of China’s modern industries and railways, its major tax resources, and all the ports through which military equipment and civilian supplies might be imported. But it still held a vast though backward territory and had unlimited manpower reserves. So long as China continued to resist, Japan’s control over the conquered eastern part of the country would be difficult.”

“Phase two: stalemate and stagnation
During the second stage of the war (1939-43) the battle lines changed very little, although there were many engagements of limited scale. Japan tried to bomb Free China into submission; Chungking suffered repeated air raids in which thousands of civilians were killed. In 1940 Japan set up a rival government in Nanking under Wang Ching-wei. But the Chinese would not submit. Hundreds of thousands migrated to west China to continue the struggle. Students and faculties of most eastern colleges took the overland trek to makeshift quarters in distant inland towns. Factories and skilled workers were reestablished in the west. The government rebuilt its shattered armies and tried to purchase supplies from abroad.

In 1938-40 the Soviet Union extended credits for military aid of 0,000,000, while the United States, Great Britain, and France granted some 3,500,000 for civilian purchases and currency stabilization. Free China’s lines of supply were long and precarious; when war broke out in Europe, shipping space became scarce. After Germany’s conquest of France in the spring of 1940, Britain bowed to Japanese demands and temporarily closed Rangoon to military supplies for China (July-September). In September 1940 Japan seized control of northern Indochina and closed the supply line to K’un-ming. The Soviet Union had provided China its most substantial military aid, but when Germany attacked the Soviet Union in June 1941, this aid virtually ceased. By then, however, the United States had sold China 100 fighter planes–the beginning of a U.S. effort to provide air protection.

In addition to bombing, the civilian population in Free China endured great hardships. Manufactured goods were scarce, and hoarding drove up prices. The government did not have the means to carry out rationing and price control, though it did supply government employees with rice. The government’s sources of revenue were limited, yet it supported a large bureaucracy and an army of more than 3,000,000 conscripts. The government resorted to printing currency inadequately backed by reserves. Inflation grew until it was nearly uncontrollable. Between 1939 and 1943 the morale of the bureaucracy and military officers declined. Old abuses of the Chinese political system reasserted themselves–factional politics and corruption, in particular. The protracted war progressively weakened the Nationalist regime.

The war had the opposite effect upon the CCP. The Communist leaders had survived 10 years of civil war and had developed a unity, camaraderie, and powerful sense of mission. They had learned to mobilize the rural population and to wage guerrilla warfare. In 1937 the CCP had about 40,000 members and the poorly equipped Red Army numbered perhaps 100,000. By agreement with the National Government, the Red Army was renamed the Eighth Route Army (later the 18th Group Army); Zhu De and Peng Dehuai

Give your answer to this question below!

Do you have any information on the FIrst and Second Sino-Japanese wars?

penghu
by Kovis

Question by ?????: Do you have any information on the FIrst and Second Sino-Japanese wars?
This is all the information I already have:

First-
Date1 August 1894 – 17 April 1895
LocationKorea, Manchuria, Taiwan, Yellow Sea
ResultJapanese victory and a significant loss of prestige for the Qing. Korea becomes independent from Qing China.
Territorial
changesQing China loses the influence of the Korean peninsula to the Empire of Japan.
Qing Dynasty China cedes Taiwan, Penghu, and Liaodong Peninsula to the Empire of Japan

Second:
Date7 July 1937 – 9 September 1945 (minor fighting since 1931)
LocationChina
ResultUnconditional surrender of all Japanese forces in China with Allied victory in World War II.
Territorial
changesRetrocession to China of Manchuria, and renunciation of sovereignty rights for Taiwan and Penghu according to the San Francisco Peace Treaty

Do you have any additional information? Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by Feisty
First one:
http://www.russojapanesewar.com/chino-war.html

Second one:
http://www.japan-101.com/history/sino1.htm

What do you think? Answer below!

Open a restaurant in Taiwan?

Question by vertex2000uk: Open a restaurant in Taiwan?
I want know if i want open a restaurant in Taiwan (in Penghu Island) how much money i need to spend for rent a place and other things…it will not be a big restaurant..just a normal one. I just want know about the average of expence.

Best answer:

Answer by Washington bureaucrat
Your restaurant would be an entrepreneurial venture.

You should check out this website for advice — http://forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=60969

In general, also see other forums on http://forumosa.com/taiwan/

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If “Chinese” tourist went on a fishing expedition in PRC-claimed waters, would he be arrested?

Question by Double-O-Naught: If “Chinese” tourist went on a fishing expedition in PRC-claimed waters, would he be arrested?
I have some associates putting around in a Penghu-based fishing vessel. Do you think they could freely go fishing around some islands near Jinmen or Matsu, or would they be arrested? They might be flying a Japanese flag; would that make any difference?

Best answer:

Answer by crzyfrank
North Korea and Japan are not on good terms. Any country that has sided with the North Korean government would probably be arrested by Japan and the same is true of North Korea they would arrest any western world allie.

What do you think? Answer below!

Q&A: what’s the definition of Taiwan Province, really? does it include Kinmen,Penghu etc…?

Question by china maven: what’s the definition of Taiwan Province, really? does it include Kinmen,Penghu etc…?
i just read here, it says it doesn’t,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan_Province

but i always thought taiwan island and those islands all belong to Taiwan Province, pls enlighten me!
but mainland china already has Fujian province, how can Taiwan province has Fujian province too?
that’s like saying oregon state is under california state, so oxymoron!

Best answer:

Answer by Dylan
Taiwan Province excludes the Kinmen

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Q&A: what is the best hotel in Penghu Island in Taiwan close to a sailing center ?

Question by barbyny: what is the best hotel in Penghu Island in Taiwan close to a sailing center ?

Best answer:

Answer by pklamba231
Kindly open site >>>>

http://www.globalhotelindex.com/hotel_results.asp?ContinentID=2&CountryID=195&CityID=63998&Language=

..

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